Wednesday, 11 February 2015

Greetings for 2015 from the researcher as a tortoise!

Classified as: project update, reflections, discourse, beautiful world


Giant tortoise - from Wikipedia
Greetings to all research participants and any other interested readers for 2015. I hope you had a great break and celebrated the summer solstice.

I haven't updated the blog for some time because I'm making slow progress at present and, yep, I did have a bit of a holiday.

Back at work now. Research things I have been doing:
  • drafting a report to research participants on project findings and implications, for feedback
  • rewriting an article about climate change denial (been doing this forever so it seems)
  • writing a short report about PCP strategic priorities in 2009-12 and 2013-17
  • reading eco-feminist theory

Hoping to get the report out to research participants within the next couple of months - so I'd better get on with it. Anyway we all know the old parable about tortoises and hares I guess (hope it's true).

In the meantime, hasn't Australian politics been interesting? We live in interesting times. Yes we all have our views on particular politicians, but isn't the basic issue that many of us (hopefully the majority) want a fairer Australia?

This article by David Marr seems to cover it pretty well: 'Abbott has failed to make the one promise that could save him: to be fair'.

Interested to hear your views on this. I know commenting on blogger is hard, but it can be done! Or you can email me on valerie.kay@monash.edu if you can't comment here.


Tuesday, 11 November 2014

Project update - project report now early next year

Classified as: project update

I had planned to send a project report to all participants in October, with a survey for final comments. However it now looks as though I won't be able to do that until early next year.

So this is just a brief update, explaining the delay. It's mainly because I have been working on two tasks: one, finishing an article on climate change denial (based on a literature review) that I hope to publish; the second, a review of Primary Care Partnership (PCP) strategic plans that I'm currently working on.

While this research is on three PCPs specifically, it's valuable to put their work in the context of what all PCPs in Victoria are doing. I began looking  at the PCP strategic plans particularly for a guest presentation I did recently for Masters of Public Health students in the 'Climate Change and Public Health' unit at Monash. I am now reviewing the plans systematically to see how many PCPs are, or were, addressing climate change and equity in their strategic priorities in 2013-17 and 2009-12.

It's been a time consuming business getting all the plans from the PCPs (the 2013-17 plans no longer appear to be published on the Department of Health website as the 2009-12 plans were) and going through them all. I hope to finish it in the next week or so, and then send my preliminary conclusions out to all the PCPs for checking. When that is completed I will return to finalising the research report for those who have been involved directly in the project.

I probably won't finish the report until December, and then I have to apply to the Ethics Committee for approval of the final survey, so I don't expect that to be completed until early next year. My apologies for this delay, but I think having the information about all the PCP plans, for context, will add value to the research.




Wednesday, 5 November 2014

Crying on the tram for Gough.

Classified as: reflective journal, politics

I had forgotten that Gough Whitlam's memorial service was on today until I was on the tram around 10.30 and started looking at twitter. The tributes started coming through and to my surprise I found tears in my eyes. Gough - and Margaret - Whitlam meant so much to my generation. I can't say it all again, it's been said many times now, but still - it's the generous heart that counts.

The Guardian had a good coverage here. Some excerpts:


Graham Freudenberg, Whitlam's speech writer ... "recalls Whitlam touching his shoulder before he gave an important speech.

'It’s been a long road, comrade, but I think we’re there. He knew how much the words and the touch would mean to me at such a moment.You would go to the barricades with such a man. The Whitlam touch is on us all. He touches us in our day-to-day lives, in the way we think about Australia, in the way we see the world. He touches, still, the millions who share his vision for a more equal Australia, a more independent, inclusive, generous and tolerant Australia, a nation confident of its future in our region and the world.' 

...

In Melbourne ... [Melissa Davey reporting]

Annie McCrory used to hold fundraisers for the Labor party in Cairns in the 70s.

Watching Gough Whitlam’s memorial service at Melbourne’s Federation Square, she shares her memories of him.

“He used to come with Margaret to our fundraising barbecues and they were a happy, lovely couple.

“She used to make jokes about him all the time, and he always laughed the loudest.

“They were wonderful people who had time for everyone. I have photos of them on my wall still.”

Sitting next to McCrory is Gillian McLeod, who says the election of Whitlam was a “breath of fresh air”.

“Australia had been waiting a long time for someone like him,” she said.

“A very long time.”

 ...

 Auntie Millie Ingram ...the welcome to country on behalf of the Gadigal people:

'The impact that the Whitlam government had on our people was enormous and can’t be underestimated. ..
Mr Whitlam, you were a brave and inspired man and we loved you and you will live on in our memories.'

...

Noel Pearson

'We salute this old man for his great love and dedication to his country and to the Australian people. When he breathed, he truly was Australia’s greatest white elder and friend without peer of the original Australians.' "

The video of Noel Pearson's speech http://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/video/2014/nov/05/noel-pearson-gough-whitlam-memorial-speech-video

RIP Gough, legend.




Sunday, 12 October 2014

Plea for clearer thinking on the population vs environment issue

Classified as: reflective journal - discourse analysis, evidence

(This is a cut and paste of a comment I just made at The Conversation, in response to this article.)

No offence to Professor Beeson, but I would really like to put in a plea for a better quality of debate about this. There are two key facts everyone should look at before talking [about population vs environment]: what's the fertility rate of a country? and, what's the emissions rate per capita of a country?
You can get it from Wikepedia, I guess it's reasonably reliable. Anyway if you look at that, you will see, for example:
  • Many wealthy countries, like Australia, have fertility rates below replacement rate (Aust is 1.77 per women, replacement is c. 2.1), but very high emissions rates per capita (Aust 18.8 t CO2e)
  • Many poor countries, like Afghanistan, have very high fertility rates (5.43), but very low emissions rates (0.29).

So while both issues are important, reducing our emissions rates is proportionately more important for the environment. And the big question is, how do you simultaneously lower emissions (particularly in rich high emissions countries) while raising living standards and the status of women in poor countries like Afghanistan?
Indonesia is an example of a country that seems to doing well - they have got their fertility rate down to 2.18, while CO2e per head is 1.8 t CO2e. India is also making a lot of progress, fertility down to 2.51 (from very high not long ago), CO2e per head 1.67t.
Almost no wealthy country seems to have low per capita emissions. Singapore looks the best with 2.67 t CO2e, and their fertility rate is apparently an amazingly low 0.8, so their total emissions look set to decline really rapidly as their population falls.
Obviously there are some examples worth looking at. Not sure how reliable Wikipedia is on all this, but it's very interesting. Maybe I should write an article on this! I get so frustrated by people over-simplifying the issue.
***
(I fell asleep very early, and woke up in the middle of the night, and have been browsing the net and looking up things on Wikipedia, especially here and here. This issue has been bugging me a bit, especially since I heard some similar claims at the Climate Action Summit - arguments made without any clarity about where fertility rates are high and where emissions rates are high. As I've suggested above, there seems to be an inverse relationship in general. Will try to do some more checking on this from original figures and update the post if needed, but just wanted to get something down on this).

Monday, 29 September 2014

Different responses to climate change

 classified as: reflective journal - discourse

The presentations from the Australian Climate Action Summit that I attended recently aren't up on the website, and I'm not sure if they all will be put up, but I want to put down some quick impressions I had of the summit. In particular, I was very interested in a difference between what I'm thinking of as 'technology can get us there, with a bit of political will' approach, and a 'we have to change the way we live, starting from the local level' approach.

As I said, presentations aren't up, so this is really impressionistic and going on memory, and I apologise to anyone I might be misrepresenting. However this was a difference that really struck me.

technology can get us there, with a bit of political will

This seems to be exemplified by speakers such as Dr Stephen Bygrave, from Beyond Zero Emissions (BZE). BZE is putting out a number of reports on different sectors, such as energy, transport and land use. Although the land use one may contain recommendations that involve substantial change to our way of life (apparently it may be quite controversial), Stephen's talk seemed to suggest we can reach zero emissions by serious investment in the right technologies such as solar or wind power, fast trains, and so on.

John Quiggin (not at the Climate Summit, but in a recent post at his blog), seems to be following a similar line: serious investment in the right technologies, plus some political will (such as regulation and carbon pricing), can keep us below the 2C level of climate change. He mentioned a number of reports recently supporting this view.

Now I haven't read all the reports in either case, so I'm going on summaries, in the latter case second hand. But I was struck by the tone of these views, as compared to the other approach I perceived:

we have to change the way we live, starting from the local level

This was illustrated in a very appealing way by Morag Gamble from Seed International. Morag talked about her garden and how it supplies all her family's food - plus she was able to give away 10,000 plants last year. She and her partner have achieved sustainable living in an eco-village, with $0 power bill and no mortgage.

Other speakers, such as Nicole Foss, focused more on the instability of the current system (particularly the financial system) and resource constraints for technology development, as predicted many years ago in Limits to Growth. Nicole, however, is also a permaculture advocate, with a focus on sustainable homes and communities.

As readers of this blog will know, the projects I've been looking at in my research tend towards the latter approach. They are local projects, with a focus on promoting community development and social inclusion as well as environmental sustainability or climate change adaptation. That's partly because health promotion in Victoria generally focuses on local projects, but also I think relates to some deeper questions I outlined in my previous post. Can we - or do we want to - continue with our big, hierarchical, unequal organisations, and still achieve sustainable living? Or do we need to live differently, in terms of more equal social organisation, as well as the different technology we use?

You may also note that there is a gender difference above: men presenting the first approach, and women the latter. I don't think that's purely random, nor the result me being selective in whom I chose to illustrate the approaches. I haven't formally researched whether the first approach is advocated more by men, and the latter by women - and within the scope of my current research, won't be able to - but I think it is a valid research question. If only I had more time! 

Finally - this should be obvious, but I know people don't always read carefully - nobody being discussed here is a climate change denier, and all their views are worth considering. Maybe both approaches can be combined in practice (to a degree?), but I think there is a lot of useful dialogue that could happen here.